Campus Planning


A campus master plan should amplify your mission and embrace your culture. Creating a plan in times of change requires a partner who understands both the physical qualities of your campus and the economics that drive higher education.

As Populous campus planners, we lead you through an evidence-based planning process that balances data-driven insights with human intuition. The result is a plan that stays true to your institution’s identity and speaks to leadership, faculty and students alike.

LEADERSHIP

THEIR EXPERIENCE

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The State University of New York (SUNY) at Buffalo
University of Buffalo Campus Planning

Pete716 / CC-BY-SA-4.0

 

With an enrollment creeping toward 30,000, aging buildings and cuts to capital project funding, SUNY Buffalo’s (UB) Capital Planning Group needed to make some hard decisions about space management. The department also needed an unconventional planning approach to help change the university’s mindset of space management being “owned” by departments to one of stewardship for the greater UB good.

The goal of the study was to conduct a high-level analysis of academic space types including classrooms, teaching laboratories, libraries, computing, tutoring, administrative offices, institutes and centers, research and lab animal facilities. In the end, the planning team identified strategies to:

› Help students “finish in 4” with more intuitive and efficient course scheduling.

› Improve UB’s instructional space mix to support more flexible models and online labs.

› Maximize space on the north and south campuses to accommodate an extra 2,000 students without new construction.

 

*Work completed by Amber Luther prior to joining Populous

Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania
Bloomsburg University Campus Planning

Photo courtesy of Bloomsburg University

 

A traditional land grant university, Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania’s campus has evolved since 1839 to meet the changing needs of its students and community. Over time the campus developed around vehicular access and convenient parking; however, in recent years the campus community expressed the desire to return to core planning principles. The campus master plan focused on reinvigorating the campus through a number of improvements including:

› Replacing parking at the front door of campus with a new welcome center and underclassman housing neighborhood.

› Developing an implementation plan for phased replacement of outdated student housing with new neighborhoods on the upper and lower campuses.

› Conducting a data-driven indoor and outdoor space use analysis which identified the need for a multi-purpose indoor facility, an addition to Nelson Field House and additional outdoor recreation space for club sports.

The planning team employed a novel approach to stakeholder engagement by supplementing traditional interviews and focus groups with a robust social media campaign. A campus planning site was created and integrated with the university’s social feeds to amplify its reach. The result was a compelling outreach campaign that reached over 7,500 students, faculty, staff and alumni by tapping into communication channels already a part of their everyday life.

 

*Work completed by Jeff Funovits and Amber Luther prior to joining to Populous

Saint Joseph’s University
Saint Joseph's Campus Planning

SJU undergraduate admissions / CC BY 2.0

 

The core focus of Saint Joseph University’s campus master plan was to define opportunities to enhance the student experience as well as to answer three specific questions:

› What is the current capacity of the university?

› What is the right-sized capacity of the university?

› How can the university grow using the right-sized capacity?

Doing more with less drove the space utilization study, which explored how the university could better use its current facilities before building new. In all, the planning team calculated the campus could accommodate nearly five percent growth without building any new space. The master plan also made recommendations to improve the experience both on and off campus with a common theme of creating places for students, faculty and staff to collaborate and interact.

Future growth into adjacent and recently-acquired property was also taken into account. A variety of options were explored on the vacant land to make sure decisions made in the near-term didn’t limit long-term opportunities. The final plan took the shape of an interactive iBook, letting the university share its vision in a creative and contemporary way while providing real-time updates and reaching stakeholders like never before.

 

*Work completed by Jeff Funovits and Amber Luther prior to joining Populous

University of Massachusetts Amherst
UMass Campus Planning

Massachusetts Office of Travel & Tourism / CC BY-ND 2.0

 

The first task of the academic master plan for the University of Massachusetts Amherst was to study existing learning environments across campus that serve approximately 1,300 faculty and staff and more than 29,000 students. The project team analyzed the location, time-use and seat-fill of each space to fully understand the current inventory. This first wave of work identified under-used rooms and a deeper dive revealed the reasons behind all the dusty desks: room size and/or location.

The next step of the plan determined the right classroom mix for the campus. Working closely with the Provost’s office, the team created a program mix that clearly identified which types of rooms were in short supply and those that were in excess across campus.

After carefully studying a variety of renovation and repurposing options, it was determined that a new classroom building was the best and most cost-effective way to right-size the campus. The planning team then explored several sites and building masses that culminated in a conceptual design for the new building.

 

*Work completed by Jeff Funovits prior to joining Populous

University of Dayton
Dayton University Campus Planning

Larry Burgess / CC-BY-SA-3.0

 

The University of Dayton sits between one of Ohio’s most affluent neighborhoods and Dayton’s struggling downtown. The genesis of the campus master plan was the acquisition of 49 acres of brownfield property next to the university. As the team explored public-private partnership opportunities for the vacant parcel, it also carefully considered the impact to the neighborhood. Projects were required to complement, not compete with, local businesses.

The final plan recommended a new performing arts building that filled both an academic and community need. Other recommendations included a renovation of the library, expanded student housing, pedestrian links to athletic venues, development of an iconic campus quad and the expansion of the University of Dayton Research Institute.

Since the completion of the master plan in 2009, the university has carried out the construction of a new $3 million campus greenspace, as well as a $53 million investment in a new LEED Gold facility by GE Aviation that anchors the south end of the extended campus.

 

*Work completed by Jeff Funovits prior to joining Populous

THEIR EXPERIENCE

blank
The State University of New York (SUNY) at Buffalo
University of Buffalo Campus Planning

Pete716 / CC-BY-SA-4.0

 

With an enrollment creeping toward 30,000, aging buildings and cuts to capital project funding, SUNY Buffalo’s (UB) Capital Planning Group needed to make some hard decisions about space management. The department also needed an unconventional planning approach to help change the university’s mindset of space management being “owned” by departments to one of stewardship for the greater UB good.

The goal of the study was to conduct a high-level analysis of academic space types including classrooms, teaching laboratories, libraries, computing, tutoring, administrative offices, institutes and centers, research and lab animal facilities. In the end, the planning team identified strategies to:

› Help students “finish in 4” with more intuitive and efficient course scheduling.

› Improve UB’s instructional space mix to support more flexible models and online labs.

› Maximize space on the north and south campuses to accommodate an extra 2,000 students without new construction.

 

*Work completed by Amber Luther prior to joining Populous

Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania
Bloomsburg University Campus Planning

Photo courtesy of Bloomsburg University

 

A traditional land grant university, Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania’s campus has evolved since 1839 to meet the changing needs of its students and community. Over time the campus developed around vehicular access and convenient parking; however, in recent years the campus community expressed the desire to return to core planning principles. The campus master plan focused on reinvigorating the campus through a number of improvements including:

› Replacing parking at the front door of campus with a new welcome center and underclassman housing neighborhood.

› Developing an implementation plan for phased replacement of outdated student housing with new neighborhoods on the upper and lower campuses.

› Conducting a data-driven indoor and outdoor space use analysis which identified the need for a multi-purpose indoor facility, an addition to Nelson Field House and additional outdoor recreation space for club sports.

The planning team employed a novel approach to stakeholder engagement by supplementing traditional interviews and focus groups with a robust social media campaign. A campus planning site was created and integrated with the university’s social feeds to amplify its reach. The result was a compelling outreach campaign that reached over 7,500 students, faculty, staff and alumni by tapping into communication channels already a part of their everyday life.

 

*Work completed by Jeff Funovits and Amber Luther prior to joining to Populous

Saint Joseph’s University
Saint Joseph's Campus Planning

SJU undergraduate admissions / CC BY 2.0

 

The core focus of Saint Joseph University’s campus master plan was to define opportunities to enhance the student experience as well as to answer three specific questions:

› What is the current capacity of the university?

› What is the right-sized capacity of the university?

› How can the university grow using the right-sized capacity?

Doing more with less drove the space utilization study, which explored how the university could better use its current facilities before building new. In all, the planning team calculated the campus could accommodate nearly five percent growth without building any new space. The master plan also made recommendations to improve the experience both on and off campus with a common theme of creating places for students, faculty and staff to collaborate and interact.

Future growth into adjacent and recently-acquired property was also taken into account. A variety of options were explored on the vacant land to make sure decisions made in the near-term didn’t limit long-term opportunities. The final plan took the shape of an interactive iBook, letting the university share its vision in a creative and contemporary way while providing real-time updates and reaching stakeholders like never before.

 

*Work completed by Jeff Funovits and Amber Luther prior to joining Populous

University of Massachusetts Amherst
UMass Campus Planning

Massachusetts Office of Travel & Tourism / CC BY-ND 2.0

 

The first task of the academic master plan for the University of Massachusetts Amherst was to study existing learning environments across campus that serve approximately 1,300 faculty and staff and more than 29,000 students. The project team analyzed the location, time-use and seat-fill of each space to fully understand the current inventory. This first wave of work identified under-used rooms and a deeper dive revealed the reasons behind all the dusty desks: room size and/or location.

The next step of the plan determined the right classroom mix for the campus. Working closely with the Provost’s office, the team created a program mix that clearly identified which types of rooms were in short supply and those that were in excess across campus.

After carefully studying a variety of renovation and repurposing options, it was determined that a new classroom building was the best and most cost-effective way to right-size the campus. The planning team then explored several sites and building masses that culminated in a conceptual design for the new building.

 

*Work completed by Jeff Funovits prior to joining Populous

University of Dayton
Dayton University Campus Planning

Larry Burgess / CC-BY-SA-3.0

 

The University of Dayton sits between one of Ohio’s most affluent neighborhoods and Dayton’s struggling downtown. The genesis of the campus master plan was the acquisition of 49 acres of brownfield property next to the university. As the team explored public-private partnership opportunities for the vacant parcel, it also carefully considered the impact to the neighborhood. Projects were required to complement, not compete with, local businesses.

The final plan recommended a new performing arts building that filled both an academic and community need. Other recommendations included a renovation of the library, expanded student housing, pedestrian links to athletic venues, development of an iconic campus quad and the expansion of the University of Dayton Research Institute.

Since the completion of the master plan in 2009, the university has carried out the construction of a new $3 million campus greenspace, as well as a $53 million investment in a new LEED Gold facility by GE Aviation that anchors the south end of the extended campus.

 

*Work completed by Jeff Funovits prior to joining Populous

Let's create a better campus together.

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